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Thursday, March 3

  1. page Digital Badges edited ... add your response here (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area? marsha.se…
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    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    marsha.semmel Mar 3, 2016City of Learning project (now called LRNG, I think), including PIttsburgh work, which is thoroughly documented and very interesting. This also, by the way, responds to the changes in the 'gig' economy and workforce
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  2. page Digital Badges edited ... (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creat…
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    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry?
    Digital learning badges allow museums. To offer more small, discrete learning opportunities that reward participation. As our wider culture shifts toward more diverse skill sets with small pieces of knowledge in more areas, we have the opportunity to lead culture in providing this knowledge. Rather than competing against more traditional degree and certificate programs, museums can carve a niche for learning. Because this can be scaled, institutions of all sizes can participate. I feel that this concept is fairly new to the general public, and is not something that will be embraced in the next 1-2 years. There is opportunity for some museums to take advantage of this now, though, and become leaders. ortiz Feb 16, 2016
    marsha.semmel Mar 3, 2016In addition to the thoughtful comments above, this is an opportunity for museums to demonstrate their value and role in the broader formal and informal learning ecosystem. This can add links and values to more traditional credentialing programs and also link to the workforce and skills needed there
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  3. page Digital Badges edited ... marsha.semmel Mar 3, 2016Museums can demonstrate the value of the many cognitive, social and e…
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    marsha.semmel Mar 3, 2016Museums can demonstrate the value of the many cognitive, social and emotional skills that they can promote and badge earners can use this recognition of museum-competencies earned in other educational settings.
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    add your response heremarsha.semmel Mar 3, 2016perhaps a bit more on the growing expansion of different sorts of credentialing. Also Pittsburgh's Remake Learning initiative and its thoroughtly documented and inclusive badging initiative
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    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry?
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  4. page Digital Badges edited ... Museums can offer lots more opportunities for the public to be "rewarded" for small …
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    Museums can offer lots more opportunities for the public to be "rewarded" for small pieces of learning. These components can be connected to offer "bigger" badges that demonstrate a participants learning, without them taking a full blown certificate or degree program. ortiz Feb 16, 2016
    Sounds like a game strategy..."finish the quest about Charismatic Macrofauna and receive your badge, then proceed to the Aquarium for your next quest!" That sort of thing.weberj Feb 28, 2016
    marsha.semmel Mar 3, 2016Museums can demonstrate the value of the many cognitive, social and emotional skills that they can promote and badge earners can use this recognition of museum-competencies earned in other educational settings.
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    add your response here
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Wednesday, March 2

  1. page Challenges edited ... Early and Iterative Prototyping The trend titled "Measuring the Impact of New Technologi…
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    Early and Iterative Prototyping
    The trend titled "Measuring the Impact of New Technologies" made me think of another important and related trend, that of early-stage, rapid, lo-fidelity, iterative prototyping. Much of the discussion under that trend referred to more formal notions of evaluation, but given that there "are not always concrete precedents for the use of new technologies in the cultural heritage sector," one approach is to experiment with lo-fidelity, iterative prototypes. Drawing on techniques taken from The Lean Startup, museums can conduct generative research using Lean Startup experiments (https://grasshopperherder.com/concierge-vs-wizard-of-oz-test/). This is an area in which the R & D Labs mentioned under Research Question 2 can really drive change. dmitroff Feb 28, 2016 +1000!! njohnson Feb 29, 2016 +1 lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016
    As I mentioned in the category about museum labs -- I think disseminating and sharing an iterative, agile, collaborative way of thinking/working should be the key goal of a lab or innovation department. How do we as 'digital' experience professionals help to transform our institutions by learning from our colleagues and working in an ongoing, iterative manners. This type of work excites me! lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016
    - I think this is so important and should be discussed more. Iteration is the future and museum need to embrace lo-fi testing especially of digital products to prevent wasting time and resources. An experimental mindset and embracing failure is key though before this will take shape long term. margaretsternbergh Feb 29, 2016
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  2. page Challenges edited ... I think this is a significant and notable challenge, and I appreciate the mention of the adopt…
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    I think this is a significant and notable challenge, and I appreciate the mention of the adoption of "digital values such as agility, flexibility, and usability." This is absolutely true; this is about more than just the latest bells and whistles, but about mindsets and values. I think that for museums to be smart about digital strategy, it is important to not lose sight of the big picture and to keep the end goals in mind when embarking on any new digital initiatives. dmitroff Feb 28, 2016
    +1 to Dana. Having recently changed institutions, it is clear to me how culture and digital values are the precursors to development relevant digital strategies. Vital in this is integrating digital strategy into multiple departments and multiple levels of the institution.margaretsternbergh Feb 29, 2016
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    Feb 29, 2016 +1 lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016
    Diminishing Value of Copyright
    The challenge of providing the broadest possible access to content, without depriving artists, authors, and other content creators of their intellectual property and income, continues to be one of the largest issues faced by museums today. Creative Commons and other alternative forms of licensing are quickly becoming mainstream; new business models must be developed that take these forms of licensing into account. And to a large extent, these new business models depend on new content development strategies.
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    Museums should follow existing and developing legal parameters in this case, but focus on being a site where fear is engaged through thoughtful consideration, dialogue and testing of new terms and conditions, data and technologies. nealstimler Feb 28, 2016
    Early and Iterative Prototyping
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    Feb 29, 2016 +1 lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016
    - I think this is so important and should be discussed more. Iteration is the future and museum need to embrace lo-fi testing especially of digital products to prevent wasting time and resources. An experimental mindset and embracing failure is key though before this will take shape long term. margaretsternbergh Feb 29, 2016
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  3. page Trends edited ... Long term, in the sense that although this is trending at the moment, it will be a long and de…
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    Long term, in the sense that although this is trending at the moment, it will be a long and decisive haul before it has become an integrated, "natural" way for museums to work together with the public around reciprocal learning and knowledge creation. Merete.Sanderhoff Feb 29, 2016
    This is short term in that it is happening now but, as Merete observes, museums have a long way to go in fully embracing this trend. I agree with Emily that the trend needs a new title. Hands-on learning? Visitor-led? laura Feb 29, 2016
    This is a short term issue in that museums are actively discussing the role of 'visitor experience', which perhaps has not always been at the forefront, especially in object-centric institutions. As more institutions tackle it, we will build a body of knowledge -- a longer haul. Examples like the Cooper Hewitt converge learning about the collection and making within the galleries. This kind of seamlessness paired with a strong experience ethos can be powerful. I also think the name should be changed.. but it's about the role and definition of our 'visitors' (and I don't like the word visitor.. it denote that it doesn't belong to them, that they aren't active participants, etc. #rant) lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016
    Expanding the Boundaries of Creativity
    Museums have long been considered beacons of creative expression within their communities. According to the American Alliance of Museum’s “Trends and Potential Futures Report,” museums “play a vital role in nurturing, documenting, organizing, interpreting and making accessible the new realm of creative output.” Emerging technologies have added new dimensions to what artists are capable of creating, in addition to making possible innovative ways for museums to display their work. Using lasers like paint brushes to generate digital strokes and programming robots to interact with patrons are just a couple examples of how the definition of art has expanded, moving far beyond traditional techniques As such, age-old perspectives of the artist as a drawer, painter, or sculptor have broadened vastly, and technology has unleashed seemingly limitless possibilities for different types of talents to enter the field. Museums are uniquely suited to maximize the emotional impact of these creative works by configuring custom, technology-enhanced spaces to enhance and personalize the visitor experience.
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    Short-term. Every conversation I have with museum staff now takes this into consideration. dianezorich Feb 29, 2016
    Short term. For many large museums, online visitor numbers dwarf physical visitors and (unsurprisingly) online visitors are far more geographically diverse. Museums are only just beginning to understand the needs, motivations and behaviors of online visitors - especially those who are visiting online collections or online rich content. laura Feb 29, 2016
    Everything is a continuum! This is happening in the short term, but what we will hopefully see in the long term are manifestations of Linked Open Data that connect collections and archives beyond the museum constructs that hold these collections. Online we have the possibility to make connections and learn pan-institutionally and create based on this new knowledge. Institutions will always have their websites for details -- but collections online could be so much freer! Much like the Digital Public Library of America -- can we have an LOD Digital Public Museum? Europeana provides this to an extent. lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016
    Increasing Cross-Institution Collaboration
    Collective action among museums is growing in importance to drive best practices in technology use across the sector. More and more, museums are joining consortia or alliances — associations of two or more organizations — to combine resources or to align themselves strategically with innovative initiatives. Today’s global environment is allowing museums to unite across international borders and work toward common goals concerning technology use, and the sharing and co-creation of collections and exhibitions. Support behind technology-enabled learning in museums has reinforced the trend toward museum communities and consortia, as leaders in the space recognize collective action as a sustainable method of supporting upgrades in museums’ technological infrastructures and digital offerings. Furthermore, many museums reside on university campuses, affording them greater opportunities to leverage the resources of the universities in addition to their academic libraries
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    Short-term. Museums need to think of themselves as social businesses rather than non-profits. This perspective includes participation in the collaborative and sharing economies. nealstimler Feb 27, 2016
    Short-term. And urgent. lkelly Feb 28, 2016
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    29, 2016 +1 lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016
    I think this can be broken down into 2 topics: how should the museum operate in a manner most conscious to our world (and considering politics... I'm not sure this is the forefront of the american public's mind, though it is in mine personally); and second the role of the museum in society (museums and ferguson, #blacklivesmatter, ) Museums should be thinking about these issues and our role short-term. lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016

    Prioritization of Mobile Content and Delivery
    Mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets, and e-readers are capturing a larger share of the information market. A Pew Research Center study of American adults reported that 42% own tablet computers, 55% own a smartphone, and 50% have a dedicated handheld device. With this shift to mobile content consumption, museum staff and audiences are expecting access to museum resources anytime and anywhere. To adapt to this growing demand, museums are integrating mobile options for content and delivery into their services, including mobile-friendly versions of websites, apps, catalogs, and e-books. As the types of mobile devices and applications continue to evolve, museums are becoming more focused on lasting solutions that are device-neutral.
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    Agree, and well said in Neal's and Linda's comments, above! dmitroff Feb 28, 2016
    I think even within institutions museum professional job descriptions will continue to be rethought. It is beginning to be the norm that digital expertise is no longer silo'd into the IT department but I think other skills and responsibilities will continue to be de-centralized. Video production, social media, etc are all areas that can and should be integrated across institutions for a more robust engagement with visitors and audiences. margaretsternbergh Feb 29, 2016
    In the changing nature of the museum profession - I think it's worth addressing the 'post-digital' situation -- where everything has a digital aspect and therefore the role of a digital department has morphed. There is still a need for technology leadership, vision, strategy and skills -- but the placement of these are fluctuating around the org chart. lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016
    Rise of Private Companies in Museum Education
    Approaches to museum education have changed with the tide of technology, aligning with the digital paradigms that are continuously shaping museum operation and interpretation. While many museums have enjoyed increased capacity and streamlined processes as a result of this shift, there is much discussion about how to leverage these developments to strengthen educational engagement. In recent years, a number of companies and startups have been working directly with or alongside museums on education-centric goals. This trend is exemplified through Museum Hack, a private company that provides interactive, highly personalized tours of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, taking visitors off of the beaten path and engaging them in alternative interpretations of world famous artworks. Attitudes vary about how third-party involvement can help accomplish the museum’s mission; some museum professionals believe that private companies can improve museums by holding up a mirror to their institutions, illuminating areas for improvement. Whatever the case, a range of enterprises and outside efforts from the private sector are increasingly shaping the future of museums with the primary goal of deepening the public’s interest in cultural heritage.
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  4. page Bring Your Own Device edited ... At MOPA, we are moving away from using QR codes and directing visitors to "MOPA.org/more&…
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    At MOPA, we are moving away from using QR codes and directing visitors to "MOPA.org/more". It's an experiment to see if we can offer links to additional content on YouTube or through our site that is easy to use and accessible for most phones and tablets. ortiz Feb 16, 2016
    laura Feb 19, 2016The Corning Museum of Glass has launched a major BYOD program and Scott Sayre wrote about the development of the program in his 2015 MW paper: http://mw2015.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/bring-it-on-ensuring-the-success-of-byod-programming-in-the-museum-environment/
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    19, 2016 MoMAThanks Laura! Come see our charing stations scott.sayre Mar 2, 2016ssayre
    MoMA
    now has
    As already included, The Museum of Modern Art in New York City is providing BYOD charging stations to its visitors __https://twitter.com/nealstimler/status/701154353760100354__. nealstimler Feb 23, 2016 So has the National Museum of Australia since around 2014:http://www.nma.gov.au/about_us/nma_corporate_documents/annual_report/annual_report_2013-2014/performance_reports/development lkelly Feb 28, 2016
    Titlow, John Paul. "How A 145-Year-Old Art Museum Stays Relevant In the Smartphone Age." FastCompany. February 29, 2016 3:34 PM. http://www.fastcompany.com/3057236/how-a-145-year-old-art-museum-stays-relevant-in-the-smartphone-age nealstimler Feb 29, 2016
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  5. page Volumetric and Holographic Displays edited ... Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row s…
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    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Larry Feb 8, 2012
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
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    Transparent OLED displays are the latest manifestation of this technology which are quickly emerging as viable commercial products. Both Planar and Samsung have released both static and multitouch versions of these displays that can be used as standalone transparent displays (think Minority Report), or integrated into casework, replacing standard soda-lime glass. http://www.planar.com/products/transparent-displays/oled/ http://www.planar.com/products/transparent-displays/lcd/ scott.sayre Mar 2, 2016ssayre
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    add your response hereI feel the category should be renamed or appended with "transparent displays". Holographic, while still a viable technology, is taking a backseat to newer technologies that do not use that name.scott.sayre Mar 2, 2016ssayre
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    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    add your response hereAs this display technology begins to mature we will begin seeing museums integrate this these types of transparent displays into their casework and environments, allowing for large scale augmented visual experiences. Labels, videos, animations and more will be overlaid on top of the objects or environments behind the transparent screens. Multitouch interfaces can further enhance these user experiences, connecting the virtual to the physical. Another great potential benefit of this technology is that it does not require a visitor's personal device to provide a personalize augmented experience. scott.sayre Mar 2, 2016ssayre
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    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    add your response hereThe Corning Museum of Glass is currently researching interpretive applications for transparent OLED displays in some of our casework. scott.sayre Mar 2, 2016ssayre
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    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]
    http://www.planar.com/products/transparent-displays/lcd/
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  6. page New Topic edited ... I could talk for days about the the positives (more technology, environment to experiment, in-…
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    I could talk for days about the the positives (more technology, environment to experiment, in-house expertise) and the negatives (how do you fund it, how to measure impact in a climate of decrease cost/increase revenue, balancing experiments with must dos). I think labs are a great idea but they absolutely need top level buy in and a clear mission and funding stream to make them work. kjaebker Feb 29, 2016 +1 njohnson Feb 29, 2016
    +1 on this idea. Also thinking about how we might as a community avoid reinventing the wheel. I think we are getting better at it, but how do we take the technology lessons we learn and grow them. More importantly, how do we take the tools we develop and make sure they are being used. I could see a museum lab going beyond being an organization that creates tools and solves digital problems for museums, but instead links museums together that have similar problems or shops around for museums to find solutions that already exist. Many museum professions don't have the resources or experience to solve the digital problems they have from resources that already exist. Instead, they create new things or rely on outdated models based on incomplete research or expertise. margaretsternbergh Feb 29, 2016
    I like to think of museum labs not necessarily as spaces for experimentation, but spaces that work in experimental, iterative means to solve problems in the museum. And done in collaboration with departments throughout the organization - a more nimble way of working that allows for learning from 'failure' and continuous improvement (perhaps not historically prevalent in museum culture) can be experienced and spread. At the Art Institute of Chicago, in an R&D capacity we brought in a 3D printer and worked with departments to think about the 'what ifs' and then experimented with problem-solving in collaboration. This lead to a larger team interested in the technology which in turn allowed for more meaningful distribution. Maybe it's not about technology -- it's about an agile, nimble, iterative, collaborative way of working. lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016
    3D digitization
    This is a broader area of digitization than just 3D printing. (I suggested the 3D printing topic be expanded in my comments in that section....) The 3D digital capture of collections will open up whole new worlds of experience. 3D models can be manipulated in virtual environments, allowing users to experience collections in new ways. Because 3D images are data points, they lend themselves to quantification and potentially new analyses using computational technologies. And because they are precise renderings, they offer new opportunities in conservation and preservation, particularly for archaeological sites and monuments. For examples of the potential of 3D digitization, see the Smithsonian's work in this area at 3d.si.edu
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    A bit off-topic, but I loved this story about 3D digitization and 'theft' of Nefertiti's bust:
    http://gizmodo.com/artists-have-secretly-3d-scanned-nefertitis-bust-for-an-1760984018 jasper Feb 25, 2016
    Beautifully said dhegley! I agree -- this is a whole new dimension on digital publishing, collections research and digital humanities. The research potential is great. lizneely.mail Mar 2, 2016
    And not only new opportunities in conservation and preservation, but also in creative re-interpretation, re-use (creative industries; serious games)...Here are some 2D examples: Europeana Creative: http://pro.europeana.eu/structure/europeana-creative; Europeana Space: http://www.europeana-space.eu/ kaja Feb 27, 2016
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    Feb 27, 2016 On the community engagement end, see also:
    Museum3D: Experiments in Engaging Audiences Using 3D -
    http://mw2015.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/museum3d-experiments-in-engaging-audiences-using-3d/ lizneely.mail Mar 2,
    2016
    [Editor's Note: Combining with 3-D Printing topic.]
    Digital Interpretation
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