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Friday, May 27

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    Introduction to the Horizon Project Wiki
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Friday, March 18

  1. page Preservation and Conservation Technologies edited ... There also is another aspect here: preservation of at-risk cultural heritage monuments and sit…
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    There also is another aspect here: preservation of at-risk cultural heritage monuments and sites.The loss or imminent risk of loss of these monuments and sites due to warfare and strife is driving considerable attention to technologies that can digitally identify, capture, and recreate these sites so they can be studied/experienced virtually should they be physically destroyed. Technologies such as 3D digitization and satellite technology as increasingly being used in this work. dianezorich Feb 23, 2016 +1 njohnson Feb 27, 2016
    Could this topic be more inclusive and relevant if you included the systems that are being developed and used to help conservation and preservation of cultural artifacts of all kinds? I'm thinking in particular about the Mellon-funded ConservationSpace system and the forthcoming TMS conservation module njohnson Feb 27, 2016
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    appear in museums.museums.chuck.patch Mar 18, 2016
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    The preservation of time-based media artworks, and moreover all the bits that make-up our cultural memory now and in the future, necessitate a paradigm shift in curriculum changes in art history, fine art and museum studies. Through online certification, university courses and professional workshops, the role of the technologist artisan must be fostered. These maker-scholars need the capacity for ongoing and exponential humanist inquiry along with the abilities to build new skills to adjust with the ever changing technological landscape. nealstimler Feb 14, 2016
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  2. page Preservation and Conservation Technologies edited ... There also is another aspect here: preservation of at-risk cultural heritage monuments and sit…
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    There also is another aspect here: preservation of at-risk cultural heritage monuments and sites.The loss or imminent risk of loss of these monuments and sites due to warfare and strife is driving considerable attention to technologies that can digitally identify, capture, and recreate these sites so they can be studied/experienced virtually should they be physically destroyed. Technologies such as 3D digitization and satellite technology as increasingly being used in this work. dianezorich Feb 23, 2016 +1 njohnson Feb 27, 2016
    Could this topic be more inclusive and relevant if you included the systems that are being developed and used to help conservation and preservation of cultural artifacts of all kinds? I'm thinking in particular about the Mellon-funded ConservationSpace system and the forthcoming TMS conservation module njohnson Feb 27, 2016
    add your response hereThere are a lot of related issues here. To begin with, museums are faced with precisely the same problems of "conventional" digital preservation that most businesses and institutions have to deal with (e.g. email), and for the most part aren't doing an especially good job with it. Then there's the issue of born-digital objects -- not just art; not just time-based -- that museums collect, and that will lose their "essential elements," as the digital preservation folks call them, if they are preserved using the methods practiced in the library community. Call this the aesthetic, or look and feel, or whatever. Finally, there's all that stuff that museums create for themselves, which includes the kinds of materials that Diane mentions above. While 3D simulations might represent the more exotic end of this spectrum, think of the hundreds of small historical societies and museums compiling oral histories and videos, and figuring they're covered because they back up to a RAID, or store the material in the cloud. These are pervasive and unglamorous problems that will emerge gradually over the next decade or two. The technology for handling this material exists, or is being developed, but what's still largely missing is a merging of the concerns of the digital curation/preservation community with those of the digital strategists who are beginning to appear in museums.
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    The preservation of time-based media artworks, and moreover all the bits that make-up our cultural memory now and in the future, necessitate a paradigm shift in curriculum changes in art history, fine art and museum studies. Through online certification, university courses and professional workshops, the role of the technologist artisan must be fostered. These maker-scholars need the capacity for ongoing and exponential humanist inquiry along with the abilities to build new skills to adjust with the ever changing technological landscape. nealstimler Feb 14, 2016
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    12:23 pm
  3. page Flipped Classroom edited ... With the existing digital divide, we need to assess if the flipped classroom model is a viable…
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    With the existing digital divide, we need to assess if the flipped classroom model is a viable solution for all students, especially for the low-income families who may not even have access to internet. pgangopadhyayPGangopadhyay Feb 28, 2016 Merete.Sanderhoff Feb 29, 2016
    Pgangopadhyay makes a good point and I think as schools adopted more approaches that rely on technology we'll see more of them work on fixing the solution of getting helping their students get access to the Internet outside of school. I know several schools in Arkansas give grants to families to help them pay for Internet access in the home. There was even a school that was pursing grant money to install antennas at the school to provide connectivity within a certain range of the school. heathermarie.wells Feb 28, 2016
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    Feb 29, 20162016chuck.patch Mar 18, 2016yes
    The digital divide is also a problem when looking at schools and teachers. In Denmark, it is estimated that only approx. 25 % of Danish public schools are digitally up to speed. This can create challenges when museums have ambitions of offering flipped classroom experiences to schools, as teachers may not be equipped with tools/capacity to accept the offer. Flipped classroom success depends very much on museums aligning their offer with the reality of schools/teachers/students level of digital knowledge, and offering collaboration and facilitation as a key component. I touched upon this topic in my 2015 essay "Wanna Play? Building bridges between open museum content and digital learning in public schools" https://medium.com/code-words-technology-and-theory-in-the-museum/wanna-play-8f8e2e8cb2fe#.7tudloqbu Merete.Sanderhoff Feb 29, 2016
    And of course there is the issue of museums aligning their offer with the administrative and academic requirements of local school administrations.chuck.patch Mar 18, 2016
    Is anyone on the panel following the ConnectED initiative?
    https://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/education/k-12/connected
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    Even just the idea of a 'flipped museum' would be an excellent starting point for new ways for visitors to experience the museum in innovative ways. Many educational projects go a long way to engage with visitors but if we read the term 'flipped' as equaling 180 degrees most of these projects that we hear about reflect a more 45 degree attempt at visitor engagement. There is still a lot that can be done here. Perhaps we can look to Christine Ortiz’s new school for inspiration shazan Feb 17, 2016. Merete.Sanderhoff Feb 29, 2016
    I love Susan Hazan's use of the term 'flipped museum.' Imagine if we were to question our long-held assumptions around what constitutes an educational museum experience. If we were to examine traditional programs from both a programmatic and technical perspective could lead to some radical new approaches. dmitroff Feb 28, 2016
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    Feb 28, 2016chuck.patch Mar 18, 2016
    I agree that flipped classroom is a pedagogy. I see this as a tremendous opportunity for museums to become integral partners of education (K-12 and University level) where museums are not just optional resources. Using the flipped classroom paradigm, museum staff and educators can co-create the student learning experiences and jointly drive impact. I am very interested in seeing some models where this is being tried... even in a pilot stage. pgangopadhyayPGangopadhyay Feb 28, 2016
    I think the flipped classroom idea could have a larger impact on schools being able to go to museums on field trips. If the notion of what needs to happen during school hours changes then it could be easier for teachers to get school administration to agree to more field trips. heathermarie.wells Feb 28, 2016
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  4. page Bring Your Own Device edited ... I think it's more CYOD (Choose your own device) than BYOD lkelly Feb 28, 2016 Love this point,…
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    I think it's more CYOD (Choose your own device) than BYOD lkelly Feb 28, 2016 Love this point, as we are exploring new ways to deliver audio tour content we are looking at ways to offer both a mobile website, mobile app, and paper-based experience at the same time as a way to meet all our visitor needs. margaretsternbergh Feb 29, 2016
    +1 to everything brought up above. jfoley Feb 29, 2016
    This is not my area of expertise, and I'm insanely past the deadline for commenting, but a few things strike me about this topic. As has been pointed out, this isn't a future technology. Most of what we should be doing is putatively available, but in most places doesn't work well enough for a lot of people to adopt it. Although I see people using smart devices in museums all of the time, it's almost entirely to photograph the objects, or themselves with the objects. Having our data easily accessible via something like Goggles (I know the Met did this in 2011, but not sure about others) would fit seamlessly with what people are already doing. Audio only, or audio-mostly has been around forever, but it still feels really clumsy (or clumsier than the rented devices of yore) in most places I've used it. Finally, the most obvious (and again, I know these exist in abundance) single thing for getting people to use a dedicated app in a museum is really robust wayfinding. I know all of this exists, but as the article by Scott that is cited below makes clear, BYOD has had spotty success, and much of the blame for that is due to inadequate infrastructure and failure to interpret social behavior in museum settings. The future of this seems more a matter of strengthening the foundations already in place through integration of some of the technologies we're discussing here, continuing to improve existing infrastructures, and improved anthropology of the museum experience chuck.patch Mar 18, 2016
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    People are starting to expect it. Those institutions that don't provide it will be seen as behind. We are no longer in a situation of "what if we offered BYOD experiences". Our visitors now understand the technology enough to know it shouldn't be a challenge to offer it. It's a huge benefit to museum interpretation and education. We can put far more resources, and hyperlink them, so that people have lots more to engage with. Visitors want more when they are interested, but we can't always fit more in an exhibition or project. With BYOD, we can give them more while they are there, and let them take it away with them. ortiz Feb 16, 2016
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Thursday, March 17

  1. page Wearable Technology edited ... Agree with the above! How do we foster a mindful, fully-engaged experience for visitors if the…
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    Agree with the above! How do we foster a mindful, fully-engaged experience for visitors if their wrist watch is constantly buzzing? Could we harness wearables to foster mindfulness in the museum? Maybe technology that self-mutes when it can tell when you are looking closely, discussing a work with a fellow visitor, or are already engaged in some other interpretive experience.margaretsternbergh Feb 29, 2016
    For those born today wearables will be passe! I think wearables are the future lkelly Feb 28, 2016
    A number of these comments posit the suggestions that we are collecting data from the technology, and that the technology is aggressively intrusive. Perhaps a better way of thinking about this is the possibility of information being quietly delivered to a device (or service behind the device) there to be accessed if and when the wearer feels like it -- more like a knowledgable companion than a hectoring schoolmarm.chuck.patch Mar 17, 2016
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    Wrist wearables are the current trend in-focus, but heads-up displays will likely return with improved technology, user experience and design. Museums responding to wearable technology also relates to the theme of electronic publishing. How can museums deliver just-in-time linked and shareable content immediately and contextually to the user either at the museum or experiencing it online in daily life? Have designers thought about label text and web information being experienced primarily through card-based applications compared to long strings of text __https://blog.intercom.io/why-cards-are-the-future-of-the-web/__? How can the audio guide further be re-formatted through a classification such as hearables __http://readwrite.com/2015/10/27/hearables-wearables-components-technology__? Wearable technology is about responding to customer desires. Museums must not attempt to intentionally throttle or restrict use of these devices. If they attempt to do so, commercial agencies and customers will work around institutions to achieve solutions as they did when museums first attempted to bar mobile devices, which ended in failure with years of user dissatisfaction, untapped learning potential and missed market opportunities. nealstimler Feb 14, 2016
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  2. page Telepresence edited ... There are numerous opportunities to do tours or offer other museum experiences through this te…
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    There are numerous opportunities to do tours or offer other museum experiences through this technology. As museums begin to embrace the online "virtual visitor" in the future, we will see all kinds of museum use this technology to connect with people who cannot physically come to the museum. ortiz Feb 16, 2016
    I think this could become a crucial concept for museums to consider and perfect. There are so many reasons that people need to or choose to be a "virtual visitor" such as physical limitations (disabilities or illness) or economic issues (not being able to afford overcoming the expense of a cross country trip) and Telepresence could be a part of a dynamic enriching solution for these visitors. Sadly many museums seem to only focus on the guests that come through the door because leadership keeps demanding higher attendance numbers and short sightedly they don't include "virtual visitors" as part of those numbers. heathermarie.wells Feb 28, 2016 jfoley Feb 29, 2016
    Telepresence, especially in combination with robotics, strikes me as an interesting way to allow access to delicate archeological or natural sites where high numbers of human visitors endanger the site. Imagine a group tour with a multi-headed robot, each head controlled by a different visitor?chuck.patch Mar 17, 2016
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    I think we should be thinking about the relationship between telepresence and VR headset technology, and whether there is potential for a blending of them. Just a thought. weberj Feb 27, 2016margaretsternbergh Feb 29, 2016
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    Feb 28, 2016chuck.patch Mar 17, 2016 and Drones!
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on education and interpretation in museums?
    It will require us to think about "visitors" in new ways. Someone may never come to the museum IRL (in real life), but may visit virtually through technology like this. People are already growing used to access everywhere. Museums will begin to lead culture by offering these experiences. In time, the virtual visit will be as important as the IRL visit. Educators will become comfortable teaching through these environments. It will be a way for museums to connect to larger audiences. Smaller museums could larger audiences through this technology. Physical size will no longer be as important of a factor as how you offer access. Access will be open to those who have physical disabilities. ortiz Feb 16, 2016 +1heathermarie.wells Feb 28, 2016
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  3. page Electronic Publishing edited ... As Mr. Stimler has suggested, great efficiencies are to be gained in digital publication of da…
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    As Mr. Stimler has suggested, great efficiencies are to be gained in digital publication of data and information that is fugitive/changeable (e.g., object metadata, bibliographic sources, digital image and other media resources) or about which museum scholarly interpretation is subject to change over time due to new knowledge gained or through scholarly argumentation. In digital form, these materials also become more capable of being discovered, accessed, and used as part of new thinking or published works. Consumers of digital publications also have the potential to extend their interaction with them through add-on tools that permit electronic annotation, group discussion, and more. njohnson Feb 25, 2016 +1 dhegley Feb 26, 2016dallen Feb 28, 2016
    Yields opportunities to work collaboratively, iteratively, and bring content producers together in ways that traditional publishing can't. For museum interpretation, digital publishing allows for more participation from readers/users in shaping the content or breaking down barriers between the author/curator and the museum community. Responsive designs of digital publication also allows for the threshold of the museum to dissolve--readers can access content on multiple platforms or simply peruse at home if something piques their interest in the museum. emily_fry Feb 26, 2016 +1 dhegley Feb 26, 2016
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    Feb 27, 2016chuck.patch Mar 17, 2016 Yes. And despite the static nature of printed publication, there are plenty of situations where people would like to have a paper publication. More exploration of the print-on-demand potential for museum publications seems warranted, not simply for out-of-print work, but for new material, perhaps taking more advantage of commercial outlets like Blurb
    I foresee digital publishing potentially impacting scholarly research in museum-related academic publications.melissa Mar 1, 2016
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
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  4. page Electronic Publishing edited ... (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best? The great …
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    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    The great value of electronic publishing for museums is the nearly immediate and expanded access to information. All museums are information providers. By placing educational and scholarly content online we make a core mission of our professional practice, learning, in the hands of users across the globe who turn first to mobile, and more so an ecosystem of interconnected devices, in order to discern their world and place in it. nealstimler Feb 14, 2016 +1 dhegley Feb 26, 2016
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    Feb 26, 20162016chuck.patch Mar 17, 2016another +1
    This area is huge and important, and museums are still slow to catch on. I would add that along with electronic publishing to digital platforms, the iterative nature of "print-on-demand" publications is important and remains significantly underutilized by museums. I was just in the new Berkeley Art Museum yesterday and was delighted when Lynne Kimura there (their academic programs educator) offered to send me the electronic version of their catalogue for the opening show. MORE OF THIS, PLEASE!! At my own institution, the Institute of the Arts and Sciences at UC Santa Cruz, we recently published 140 page print-on-demand catalogue for a show that reimagined the university as a museum. This allowed us to do a nice publication for essentially the cost of design, and make it available worldwide, plus, we don't need to store unsold copies, and we won't run out if we need more. We are a start-up operation with a small budget, and this allows us to do a good publication with minimal capital investment. That's huge. Here's the link if you wish to check it out: http://www.amazon.com/Collective-Museum-Collection-University-California/dp/1519767293
    weberj Feb 27, 2016
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    8:23 am

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